Crumbling Fire Tower Road promises to get worse

Milfor supervisors insist that Columbia pay for repairs after compressor upgrade


Make text smaller Make text larger



Photos



  • Cracks along Fire Tower Road in Milford Township. (Photo by Charles Reynolds)




  • Milford compressor station (Photo by Charles Reynolds)



They have “an obligation to do it."
Supervisor Gary Clark


By Charles Reynolds

— Milford Township supervisors are worried about the cracked condition of Fire Tower Road, which will be getting heavy use when the Columbia Pipeline Group starts work on the Milford compressor station upgrade.

Along the nearly two-mile stretch of road, the gas company will bring in equipment weighing 80,000 pounds or more for the better part of a year. All township roads are rated at a capacity of only 10,000 pounds.

Supervisor Gary Clark has been the township's point person in talks with Columbia's parent company, NiSource. He wants to ensure the company builds a station that is environmentally sound and safe for residents. He also expects the company to “do the right thing” and comply with the township's request to repave Fire Tower Road after the upgrade is completed.

Clark feels it's not just an option for the company. They have “an obligation to do it," he said.

Scott Maciak, the municipal services specialist for the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, consulted with supervisors Clark and Gary Williams. He said it will cost the township $300,000 to properly pave the length of road.

“That would take (the township) years and years to repave this road to get it back to where it should be” after the work Columbia will be doing, said Clark.

Even after the compressor is completed, Clark said, Columbia will be bringing heavy equipment up the road from time to time for service and maintenance.

The road is showing serious signs of wear with major cracks and breaks, especially near the entrance to the existing compressor station.

Several years ago, when Columbia did work along the pipeline, their contractor, Henkles and McCoy, gave the township $8,000 for road repair. Yet the road today, especially after the recent winter, shows serious signs of disintegration.

Scott Castleman, a spokesperson for Columbia Pipeline Group, said the company still needs to check out the road.

"On projects such as this we inspect the impacted road before construction to document the current condition," Castleman wrote in an email to the Courier. "We then restore the road to current or better condition once construction is complete."




Make text smaller Make text larger

Comments

Pool Rules



MUST READ NEWS

Soap Box Derby crowns four champions
— The 19th annual Port Jervis Soap Box Derby crowned four champs on June 10.
Twelve-year old Dylan LeBlanc, 13-year old...

Read more »
Image

Beloved Pike County man dies after battle with 9/11-linked leukemia
By Marilyn Rosenthal
Everyone knew him as “Tommy.” He was the man with the big, welcoming smile; the man who volunteered to help anyone and everyone, without...

Read more »
Image

Farewell and so long, Delaware Valley
The Class of 2018, Delaware Valley High School:
Dominique Accetta
Joseph Actisdano
Abigail Alex
Josephine Allen
Andrew Almodoval
Craig Anderson,...

Read more »
Image

Trucker in driver’s ed triple fatality is sentenced
By Linda Smith Hancharick
— August Harlacher of Shohola, Pa., the tractor-trailer driver involved in the horrific crash...

Read more »
Image

VIDEOS



Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required
Community Newspapers


MOST READ

Obituaries
Linda A. DeGroat dies at age 62
  • Jun 20, 2018
Local News
Farewell and so long, Delaware Valley
  • Jun 20, 2018

MOST COMMENTED



Weather in Milford, PA