Check your chickens for deadly flu, extension director says

Avian flu on Eastern flyway but not yet in Pennsylvania, says Dave Messersmith


Make text smaller Make text larger



Photos



  • Dave Messersmith, Pike County's Penn State Extension's Interim District Director (Photo by Anya Tikka



By Anya Tikka

— Avian influenza, a highly infectious disease that affects domestic chickens and turkey, has been identified recently in Tennessee, said Penn State Extension’s Interim District Director Dave Messersmith at Pike County Commissioners’ early May meeting.

“It’s not very close, but it’s a disease that’s very mobile, so it can move very quickly from one bird to another," he said.

He cautioned anyone who keeps domestic fowl to keep an eye on them for any signs of disease or possible deaths, and to report them to the Extension or the Department of Agriculture "so we can figure out what’s going on with a follow up.”

The disease doesn’t spread to people or other animals, said Messersmith.

The "bird flu," he said, is very contagious from bird to bird, and wild migratory birds can also spread it, carrying the disease although not necessary sick themselves.

“When they land intermittently, there’s a chance they mingle with domestic chickens or turkeys, and they can leave their droppings," he said. "It’s highly infectious disease, so even a small amount of contact can spread it. If they’re infected, they can spread it up and down as they migrate.”

The disease is limited to wild fowl — ducks and geese, not raptors, he said. But once a bird is infected, there’s no cure. Birds will die from it.

Nothing has been found in the United States this year except in Tennessee, indicating the disease is traveling on the Eastern flyway.

“In Pennsylvania, it’s a threat to the poultry industry, a big industry in Pennsylvania, while not necessarily in Pike County," Messersmith said. "But there are a lot of people who have backyard chickens, so the concern is for them to continue to monitor your flock, if birds are getting sick or dying, to notify us or the Department of Agriculture.”

Messersmith said the disease has been a concern in U.S. for a couple of years.

“It’s proven it doesn’t affect people or other animals, so there’s no concern for that,” he said.

Related story"No backyard chickens in Dingman, supervisors decide": http://bit.ly/2qxew5d


Make text smaller Make text larger

Comments

Pool Rules



MUST READ NEWS

Join 'Midwifery Mingle' at the Cooperage
HONESDALE — Women of all ages and their children are invited to the annual "Midwifery Mingle" from 3 to 5 p.m. on Tuesday,...
Image Evan Snyder completes Eagle Scout project
Delaware Valley High School student Evan Snyder (pictured) has completed his Eagle Scout project, which provided the Children's Advocacy Center (CAC) of Safe Haven of Pike County...
Image 'Faure-In-A-Day' workshop coming to Drew Methodist
, N.Y. — All singers are welcome to a one-day "Faure Requiem" workshop hosted by the Tri-State Chorale from 2 to 5...
Image Anti-Semitic graffiti found at Airport Diner days before Rosh Hashanah
BY ERIKA NORTON
Residents in the Sussex/Wantage area woke up on Sunday morning to news of a grim discovery —...

VIDEOS



Sign up to get our newsletter emailed to you every week!

  • Enter your email address in the box below.
  • Select the newsletters you would like to subscribe to.
  • Click the 'SUBSCRIBE' button.



MOST READ

Local News
Chamber awards dinner rescheduled
  • Sep 19, 2017
Entertainment
Newton Theatre to present A Christmas Carol
  • Sep 18, 2017
Entertainment
St. Joseph's to hold tricky tray
  • Sep 17, 2017
Where in clues
Pike's Peek
  • Sep 14, 2017
Local News
Venturing toward Alaska
  • Sep 13, 2017
Local News
Delaware River frack ban moves forward
  • Sep 14, 2017
Entertainment
Readers and Writers Festival gets busy
  • Sep 14, 2017

MOST COMMENTED



Weather in Milford, PA