Shohola Life Scout builds gaga ball pit for students

Shohola. Mrs. Maida is retiring this year, but thanks to her idea and Mark DeBlock’s efforts, her students will have an exhilarating outside game to play for years to come.

16 Sep 2019 | 02:06

In 2018, Mrs. Maida, physical education teacher at Shohola Elementary School, approached members of Boy Scout Troop 71 looking for someone to build a gaga ball pit for her students.

Gaga ball is a variety of dodgeball that has become very popular with school-age children. Mark DeBlock, a Life Scout from Troop 71 in Milford, thought this would be a great idea for his Eagle Project.

With the guidance of his troop leadership, along with the project coach, Bob Phillips, Mark developed plans for the project. He met with the Eagle board to present the plans and receive approval to proceed with the project.

Over the next year, he led groups of Scouts and adults in building the game pit. He resented it enthusiastically on Aug. 28 -- just in time for the new school year. He also presented a plaque dedicating the project to Mrs. Maida and to the students.

Mrs. Maida is retiring this year, but thanks to her idea and Mark’s efforts, her students will have an exhilarating outside game to play for years to come.

About gaga ball
Gaga ball is played in a large fenced in area, usually an octagon or hexagon. The gaga ball can vary in size and form, such as a foam dodgeball or a rubber kickball.
The game begins when one player or the referee throws the ball into the air. While their backs or hands are against the wall, the players shout "ga" on each of the first three bounces.
After three bounces, the ball is in play, and the players may leave the wall and "hit" the ball at each other in the pit.
A player who is hit by the ball or breaks a rule is eliminated and must leave the game.
Players may not "hit" the ball twice in a row, and a player who causes the ball to leave the pit is out.
When the ball is caught in the air on a fly, the last person to hit the ball is out.